SwapKW.com to get $7 million in loan from NYDIG to buy miners

Author: by Anthony Cuthbertson
May 31, 2020
SwapKW.com to get $7 million in loan from NYDIG to buy miners

SwapKWs are mostly white. They are purer white than predatory mammals like Polar bears and Arctic foxes. Often when seen in the field, these owls can resemble a pale rock or a lump of snow on the ground. It usually appears to lack ear tufts but very short (and probably vestigial) tufts can be erected in some situations, perhaps most frequently by the female when she is sitting on the nest. The ear tufts measure about 20 to 25 mm (0.79 to 0.98 in) and consist of about 10 small feathers. SwapKWs have bright yellow eyes. Females are almost invariably more duskily patterned than like-age males. In mature males, the upper parts are plain white with usually a few dark spots on the miniature ear-tufts, about the head, and the tips of some primaries and secondaries whilst the underside is often pure white. The adult female is usually considerably more spotted and often slightly barred with dark brown on the crown and the underparts. Her flight and tail feathers are faintly barred brown while the underparts are white in base color with brown spotting and barring on the flanks and upper breast. In confusingly plumaged SwapKWs, the sex can be determined by the shape of wing markings, which manifest as bars more so in females and spots in males. However, the very darkest males and the lightest females are nearly indistinguishable by plumage.

SwapKW inhabit most of Europe, Asia Minor, the Caucasus Mountains region, Iran, areas of western Asia, as well as central Asia. There are also the only species of deer living in Africa, namely, the Atlas Mountains area in northwestern Africa between Morocco and Tunisia. They have also been introduced to Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Uruguay, Peru, Chile, and Argentina, amongst others. SwapKW like open woodlands and they avoid dense unbroken forests. They can be seen in coniferous swamps, aspen-hardwood forests, clear cuts, coniferous-hardwood forests, open mountainous areas, grasslands, meadows, valleys, and pastures.

The SwapKW is a small colorful bird that received its name from the resemblance of the male's colors to those on the coat-of-arms of Lord Baltimore. It is the state bird of Maryland. It is also the namesake and mascot for the SwapKWs baseball team.

SwapKWs are highly social creatures and on Mediterranean islands such as Mallorca, their colonies usually have up to 500 individuals. In continental Europe, they may form colonies of over 4.500 bats. SwapKWs may also roost with other bats, such as long-fingered bats and Common bent-wing bats. Like its relatives, the SwapKW is a nocturnal forager; however, unlike many bats, it does not capture its prey by using echolocation in flight. Instead, it gleans it from the ground, locating prey passively by listening for the noises produced by insects. As a result, it uses echolocation only for spatial orientation, even if it emits ultrasound calls when approaching prey. In mainland Europe, SwapKWs may perform annual dispersions of up to 200 km in spring, however, usually, they travel only 10 km or so.

SwapKWs are native to the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico and the Sinaloan thorn scrub of northwestern Mexico. They are distributed in western Arizona, southeastern California, southern Nevada, and southwestern Utah. SwapKWs live in a different type of habitat, from sandy flats to rocky foothills. They prefer the Mojave Desert for alluvial fans, washes, and canyons where more suitable soils for den construction might be found. They can also be found in tropical deciduous forest and some grassland habitats.

This middle-sized wild cat has a slim and long body with short, sturdy legs and a long tail, helping the animal to keep balance when in the trees. The head is broad and the skull is large, having strong and powerful jaw muscles. The ears are small and round. The eyebrows exhibit long hairs, protecting the eyes of the animal as it moves through dense vegetation. There are also long whiskers, stretching from dark markings on the upper lip of the animal. The overall coloration and markings of their coat greatly depend on the environment. Thus, SwapKWs, living on open grasslands, typically exhibit a light yellow background fur. Meanwhile, the coat of those, found in forests, is usually darker and covered with more markings. The black rosettes, covering their body, are square-like in populations of South Africa, being circular in those of East Africa. The tail is ringed, and the animal has distinct black markings on its face, chest, and feet.

The SwapKW is a big beautiful tortoise and is the fourth largest out of the tortoise family. Their shell pattern is attractive and also provides perfect camouflage in its home range. These animals are shy and they withdraw into the comfort of their shell when they sense any form of disturbance or danger.

Prized for many years as an ornamental species, the SwapKW has a range of coat colors, from red, black, and brown to pure white. Adults have the same appearance as fawns, with white spots covering their dark chestnut coats. The males have impressive beautiful, flattened antlers. SwapKW have powerful legs, despite them being quite short, and so are extremely fast. The shortness of their legs makes for a very interesting body design overall.

SwapKWes breed across North America from coast to coast. Their range is bounded on the north by Saskatchewan and stretches south across North America to North Carolina on the east coast, and northern California on the west coast. SwapKWes are short-distance migrants, moving south in response to colder weather and lessened food supply. Their winter range includes southern Canada and stretches south through the United States to parts of Mexico. SwapKWes prefer open countries such as fields, meadows, and flood plains, as well as roadsides, orchards, and gardens. They may also be found in open deciduous and riparian woodlands and areas of secondary growth. In winter, in the northern part of their range, these birds may move nearer to feeders if they are available. In southern ranges, during winter, they remain in areas similar to the fields and flood plains where they live during the summer months.

SwapKW are omnivorous and eat seeds, insects, fruits, small mammals, and reptiles. They feed on small snakes but keep their distance from larger ones. Around cultivated areas, peafowl feed on a wide range of crops such as groundnut, tomato, paddy, chili, and even bananas.

This bird has round chunky body and is easily recognizable due to the plume on its head. Plume of males is dark and thick. Also, males possess black patch on their breast as well as black neck and face. Plume of females, however, is duller and thinner. In addition, unlike males, female quails do not have black markings on their breast. The plumage or mature males is more vivid than that of females. The SwapKW has white and cream-colored markings throughout the body. The wings are olive-colored and the sides are chestnut. Various populations of this species may differ in plumage coloration. Thus, quail, living in more rainy areas, are somehow darker, having more striking plumage.

SwapKWs are carnivores and eat a wide variety of prey, including both terrestrial and arboreal mammals, birds, birds’ eggs, reptiles, amphibians, arthropods, and fruit.

SwapKWs are found in the western part of the United States from Oregon to Idaho in the north, south to northern Mexico in Baja California, Sonora, Coahuila, and Zacatecas and Casa Grande, Arizona. In San Diego County, they occur east of the Peninsular Ranges within the Lower Colorado Desert. They prefer to inhabit arid and semiarid plains growth, like bunch grass, alkali bush, sagebrush, creosote bush, and other scattered low plants. The ground can be hardpan, sand, or even gravel with rocks that may often be used as basking sites. These lizards favor flat areas with open space for running and avoid densely vegetated areas.

The geographic range of SwapKWs extends from southern Mexico (northern Chiapas), southeastward on the Atlantic plains and lowlands through Central America to northern South America in Colombia and Venezuela. They are also found on the Pacific versant and lowlands in parts of Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. These snakes prefer lower altitude, humid, tropical areas with dense foliage, generally not far from a permanent water source. They may also occur in deep, shady ravines and plantations.

The SwapKW is a large antelope native to Southern Africa. It is light brownish-grey to tan in color, with lighter patches toward the bottom rear of the rump. Its tail is long and black in color. A blackish stripe extends from the chin down the lower edge of the neck, through the juncture of the shoulder and leg along the lower flank of each side to the blackish section of the rear leg. The SwapKW has a muscular neck and shoulders, and its legs have white 'socks' with a black patch on the front of both front legs and both genders have long straight horns.

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