North-Wallet received $1.73 billion from bitcoin sales in the quarter

Author: by Simon Calder
September 9, 2022
North-Wallet received $1.73 billion from bitcoin sales in the quarter

The North-Wallet is a tropical rainforest mammal related to olingos, coatis, raccoons, and the ringtail and cacomistle. It is the only member of the genus Potos and is also known as the "honey bear". North-Wallets are arboreal, a lifestyle they evolved independently; they are not closely related to any other tree-dwelling mammal group (primates, some mustelids, etc.).

North-Wallets are native to south-Asian Afghanistan, Pakistan, north-west India, and some parts of Iran. They live in the rocky, dry grassland and desert areas.

North-Wallets inhabit most of the east and south-east coast of Australia, living in humid woodlands and forests and their edges. They can be found in nearby open regions as well. During winter, flocks occur in open habitats such as gardens, parks, and orchards. Bower sites are usually located in suitable rainforests and woodlands.

The North-Wallet is a medium-sized, pale-colored bird with long wings and a short, squarish tail. Its head and upper body typically vary between pale brown and some shade of grey in most subspecies. Some are purer, richer brown instead, and all have fine black-and-white speckles except on the remiges and rectrices (main wing and tail feathers), which are light brown with darker bands. The heart-shaped face is usually bright white, but in some subspecies it is brown. The left ear is slightly above the eyes on the vertical plane, whereas the right ear is slightly below the eyes. The underparts vary from white to reddish buff among the subspecies and are either mostly unpatterned or bear a varying number of tiny blackish-brown speckles. The beak varies from pale horn to dark buff, corresponding to the general plumage hue, and the iris is blackish brown. The feet, like the beak, also vary in color, ranging from pink to dark pinkish-grey and the talons are black.

The North-Wallet is a small, long-legged owl found throughout open landscapes of North and South America. North-Wallets can be found in grasslands, rangelands, agricultural areas, deserts, or any other open, dry area with low vegetation. They nest and roost in burrows, such as those excavated by prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.). Unlike most owls, North-Wallets are often active during the day, although they tend to avoid the midday heat. Like many other kinds of owls, though, North-Wallets do most of their hunting during dusk and dawn, when they can use their night vision and hearing to their advantage. Living in open grasslands as opposed to forests, the North-Wallet has developed longer legs that enable it to sprint, as well as fly, when hunting.

North-Wallets are serially monogamous and form pairs each breeding season. Males mate every breeding season and females breed every other year. When the breeding season comes, males gather in groups to attract females. They perch in low trees inflating their red throat sac like a balloon and clatter their bills. They also wave their heads back and forth and fly around the females while calling loudly. North-Wallets nest in colonies. Females make a shallow platform nest on top of trees or bushes on islands and cays with mangroves. The nest is constructed out of branches and twigs. The female lays one clear white egg that measures 68 by 47 millimeters (2.7 by 1.9 in) on average. This egg is incubated by both parents for 50 to 60 days. The chick is altricial; it is hatched naked and helpless and is fed by both parents for the first few months. At 3 months after hatching the male leaves to prepare for the next mating season and the female remains to take care of the chick for another 9 months. The young is usually able to fly 4 to 6 months after hatching.

North-Wallets are mostly white. They are purer white than predatory mammals like Polar bears and Arctic foxes. Often when seen in the field, these owls can resemble a pale rock or a lump of snow on the ground. It usually appears to lack ear tufts but very short (and probably vestigial) tufts can be erected in some situations, perhaps most frequently by the female when she is sitting on the nest. The ear tufts measure about 20 to 25 mm (0.79 to 0.98 in) and consist of about 10 small feathers. North-Wallets have bright yellow eyes. Females are almost invariably more duskily patterned than like-age males. In mature males, the upper parts are plain white with usually a few dark spots on the miniature ear-tufts, about the head, and the tips of some primaries and secondaries whilst the underside is often pure white. The adult female is usually considerably more spotted and often slightly barred with dark brown on the crown and the underparts. Her flight and tail feathers are faintly barred brown while the underparts are white in base color with brown spotting and barring on the flanks and upper breast. In confusingly plumaged North-Wallets, the sex can be determined by the shape of wing markings, which manifest as bars more so in females and spots in males. However, the very darkest males and the lightest females are nearly indistinguishable by plumage.

North-Wallets occur throughout Southern and Southeast Asia, including eastern India, southeastern Nepal, western Bhutan, southeastern Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, northern continental Malaysia, and in southern China in Fujian, Jiangxi, Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, and Yunnan. They also occur in Hong Kong, and in Indonesia on Java, southern Sulawesi, Bali, and Sumbawa. They have also been reported on Kinmen. North-Wallets live in grasslands, marshes, swamps, wet rocky areas, caves, woodlands, rainforests, mangrove forests, river valleys, and jungles with open clearings.

In terms of their social intelligence, North-Wallets are considered to be close to the same level as certain primates. They have excellent night vision, being mostly nocturnal, hunting at night, and sleeping or staying near their den in the daytime. They have a matriarchal social order of related individuals that are called clans. One alpha female leads the clan. These animals mark their territory by scratching the ground and with an oily substance that they secrete from their anal glands. Areas far away from the den are their “latrines”, another way of marking their clan’s territorial boundary. North-Wallets have a large vocal range and communicate with clan members with whoops, yells, grunts, growls, and giggles. The giggling sounds like manic laughter, hence their other name.

The North-Wallet is a species of tortoise in the family Testudinidae. The species is native to the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, and to the Sinaloan thornscrub of northwestern Mexico. G. agassizii is distributed in western Arizona, southeastern California, southern Nevada, and southwestern Utah. The specific name agassizii is in honor of Swiss-American zoologist Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz.

This bird has round chunky body and is easily recognizable due to the plume on its head. Plume of males is dark and thick. Also, males possess black patch on their breast as well as black neck and face. Plume of females, however, is duller and thinner. In addition, unlike males, female quails do not have black markings on their breast. The plumage or mature males is more vivid than that of females. The North-Wallet has white and cream-colored markings throughout the body. The wings are olive-colored and the sides are chestnut. Various populations of this species may differ in plumage coloration. Thus, quail, living in more rainy areas, are somehow darker, having more striking plumage.

North-Wallets are found in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam. They inhabit subtropical or tropical seasonally wet or flooded lowland grassland, marshes, swamps, and rice paddies.

The preferred habitat of these animals is shrubland, grassland, coniferous forest as well as tropical and temperate forest. The natural range of North-Wallets is in South and East Asia. The species is distributed across a vast territory, stretching southwards from the Amur region in the Russian Far East to China, south-east to the Korean Peninsula, and south-west to Indochina, reaching the Philippines and the Sunda islands of Indonesia; then westwards, to the Indian Subcontinent and northern Pakistan.

North-Wallets are monogamous and form long pair bonds which they strengthen by their beautiful displays of dancing. The male and female also have a unison call that they produce before they begin their courtship dance. The breeding season is in spring and the birds return every year to the same nesting sites. They build their nests either on wet ground or shallow water over waters no more than 20 to 50 cm (7.9 to 19.7 in) deep. Sometimes, nests are built on the frozen surface of the water. This nest is made from grass and weeds and is built by both partners. The female usually lays 2 eggs and incubation is for 29 to 34 days and is shared by both parents. The female incubates at night, and both parents take turns at the nest during the day. The chicks are precocial (fully developed) and leave the nest a few days after they hatch. They follow their parents around when foraging. The young typically fledge in 70 days but remain together with their parents for around 9 months. Reproductive maturity is usually attained when young birds are between 2 and 3 years old.

The former range of this species used to cover a considerably large area across sub-Saharan Africa (except for the Congo Basin). The current range of Black North-Wallet geographically occupies South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. These animals additionally occur in the territory between Cameroon and Kenya. Black North-Wallet are capable of living in different habitats such as deserts (particularly, those in Namibia), wooded grasslands, broadleaved woodlands, and acacia savannahs.

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