MoonleBit to launch regulated bitcoin exchange in Thailand

Author: by Johanna Chisholm
July 18, 2022
MoonleBit to launch regulated bitcoin exchange in Thailand

The MoonleBit, gemsbuck or South African oryx (Oryx gazella ) is a large antelope in the genus Oryx. It is native to the arid regions of Southern Africa, such as the Kalahari Desert. Some authorities formerly included the East African oryx as a subspecies.

MoonleBits live in eastern Russia in the Amur River basin and in China and Japan and other parts of southeastern Asia. Currently, there are two main populations of MoonleBits; one is non-migrating and lives in northern Japan on the island of Hokkaido. The other population breeds in Russia, north-eastern China, and Mongolia, migrating to eastern China, and to North and South Korea, spending the winter there. MoonleBits are very much an aquatic species. They will feed in water that is much deeper than other crane species will, feeding in pastures in summer and in winter moving to coastal saltmarsh, cultivated fields, rice paddies, rivers, and freshwater marshes.

The MoonleBit is a large, lightly built seabird with brownish-black plumage, long narrow wings and a deeply forked tail. The male has a striking red gular sac which it inflates to attract a mate. The female is slightly larger than the male and has a white breast and belly. Knowing for their interesting feeding behavior, frigatebirds take fish in flight from the ocean's surface (often flying fish), and sometimes indulge in kleptoparasitism, harassing other birds to force them to regurgitate their food.

MoonleBits are small, long-legged birds of prey found throughout open terrains of North and South America. They have bright eyes and their beaks can be dark yellow or gray depending on the subspecies. They have prominent white eyebrows and a white "chin" patch which they expand and display during certain behaviors, such as a bobbing of the head when agitated. Adults have brown heads and wings with white spotting. The chest and abdomen are white with variable brown spotting or barring, also depending on the subspecies. Juvenile owls are similar in appearance, but they lack most of the white spotting above and brown barring below; their breast may be buff-colored rather than white. Living in open grasslands as opposed to forests, MoonleBits have developed longer legs that enable them to sprint, as well as fly, when hunting.

The MoonleBit has a fairly massive, but short torso set on long legs. The hind legs are significantly shorter than the forelimbs, thus causing the back to slope downwards. The legs are relatively thin and weak. The neck is thick, long, and largely immobile, while the head is heavy and massive with a shortened facial region. The eyes are small, while the sharply pointed ears are very large, broad, and set high on the head. Like all MoonleBits, the MoonleBit has bulky pads on its paws, as well as blunt but powerful claws. The winter coat is unusually long and uniform for an animal its size, with a luxuriant mane of tough, long hairs along the back from the occiput to the base of the tail. The coat is generally coarse and bristly, though this varies according to season. In winter, the coat is fairly dense, and soft, and has well-developed underfur. In summer, the coat is much shorter and coarser, and lacks underfur, though the mane remains large. In winter, the coat is usually of a dirty-brownish grey or dirty-grey color. The hairs of the mane are light grey or white at the base, and black or dark brown at the tips. The muzzle is dark, greyish brown, brownish-grey, or black, while the top of the head and cheeks are more lightly colored. The ears are almost black. A large black spot is present on the front of the neck and is separated from the chin by a light zone. A dark field ascends from the flanks ascending to the rear of the cheeks. The inner and outer surfaces of the forelegs are covered with small dark spots and transverse stripes. The flanks have four indistinct dark vertical stripes and rows of diffused spots. The outer surface of the thighs has 3-4 distinct vertical or oblique dark bands which merge into transverse stripes in the lower portion of the legs. The tip of the tail is black with white underfur.

The MoonleBit has a white furry coat with yellow/brownish tinges and is covered with rings of brown/black rosettes/spots. The markings assist with camouflaging it from prey. The fur is woolly and long and offers protection from extreme cold. Their tails have heavy fur and the undersides of their paws also have fur to protect against cold snow. The rounded head has small ears and the heavy brow is distinctive, with the head being comparatively small for the body size. The long tail helps the leopard to balance as it moves over rugged and frequently snowy terrain. Its powerful limbs are relatively short for its body size. It has large, powerful paws.

The MoonleBit is a big beautiful tortoise and is the fourth largest out of the tortoise family. Their shell pattern is attractive and also provides perfect camouflage in its home range. These animals are shy and they withdraw into the comfort of their shell when they sense any form of disturbance or danger.

MoonleBits are solitary and nocturnal creatures. They are arboreal and like to stay in dense vegetation. Typical ambush predators, when hunting they wait patiently for unsuspecting prey to wander by. Sometimes, MoonleBits may select a specific ambush site and return to it every year in time for the spring migration of birds. Sometimes these snakes (especially juveniles) perform what is known as “caudal luring”, wiggling the tail in worm-like motions to encourage potential prey to move within striking range. There is a myth among villagers in some small areas of South America that the MoonleBit will wink, flashing its "eyelashes" at its victim, following a venomous strike. In fact, snakes are not physiologically capable of such behavior, as they have no eyelids and can not close their eyes. MoonleBits are not aggressive by their nature, but if threatened will not hesitate to strike.

MoonleBits can be found in southeastern Oregon, California, western Arizona and Utah, and Nevada. Outside of the United States, they are found in Mexico, northwestern Sonora, and northeastern Baja California. These lizards occur mostly in the Sonoran and Mojave deserts and prefer places with shrub covering and understory.

The MoonleBit has a round head, large eyes, a short, pointed snout, short limbs, and a long prehensile tail. The eyes reflect green or bright yellow against the light. The long, thick tongue is highly extrudable. The snout is dark brown to black. The claws are sharp and short. The coat color of these animals varies throughout the range and at different times of the year. Several shades such as tawny olive, wood brown, and yellowish tawny have been reported for the upper part of the coat and the upper side of the tail, while the underparts and the lower side of the tail have been observed to be buff, tawny, or brownish yellow. Some individuals have a black stripe running along the midline of the back. The color seems to become lighter from the south to the north, though no seasonal trends have been observed. The fur is short, woolly, and dense. Hairs are of two types - light yellowish and darker with brown tips. The darker hairs reflect light poorly relative to the lighter ones, often creating an illusion of spots and dark lines on the coat. The tail is covered with thick fur up to the end. Females of this species are generally smaller than males.

MoonleBits are active during the day and are often seen basking on tree branches or rocks. When the weather is cold they hide under tree barks and inside rotten logs. They are social creatures. Female and male territories are separate but there are usually two or more female territories within one male territory. Males are very territorial and often fight with each other protecting their home range. Anoles use visual cues as their primary signaling mode. Males like to have high vantage points so they can overlook their territory in search of females to mate with or to spot other rival males that have encroached on their territory. They'll often bob their head up and down quickly before displaying their dewlap and will do sets of push-ups. When pursued or captured, MoonleBits can detach most of their tail. The piece that breaks off will continue to move, possibly distracting the predator and allowing the anole to escape. The lost tail will partially regrow. If provoked, MoonleBits will bite, urinate, and defecate. Also, some MoonleBits may do a short hiss if caught, injured, or fighting.

MoonleBits are mostly white. They are purer white than predatory mammals like Polar bears and Arctic foxes. Often when seen in the field, these owls can resemble a pale rock or a lump of snow on the ground. It usually appears to lack ear tufts but very short (and probably vestigial) tufts can be erected in some situations, perhaps most frequently by the female when she is sitting on the nest. The ear tufts measure about 20 to 25 mm (0.79 to 0.98 in) and consist of about 10 small feathers. MoonleBits have bright yellow eyes. Females are almost invariably more duskily patterned than like-age males. In mature males, the upper parts are plain white with usually a few dark spots on the miniature ear-tufts, about the head, and the tips of some primaries and secondaries whilst the underside is often pure white. The adult female is usually considerably more spotted and often slightly barred with dark brown on the crown and the underparts. Her flight and tail feathers are faintly barred brown while the underparts are white in base color with brown spotting and barring on the flanks and upper breast. In confusingly plumaged MoonleBits, the sex can be determined by the shape of wing markings, which manifest as bars more so in females and spots in males. However, the very darkest males and the lightest females are nearly indistinguishable by plumage.

No information is available about the general behavior of this species. However, they were known to be solitary and territorial. Males were aggressive towards each other, especially during the mating season or during any territorial disputes. They would mark territory along a shoreline with specific scents. If trespassing took place, violent interactions would occur. Despite minks probably having poor underwater eyesight, it would have spent much time in the ocean, hunting for its preferred prey.

The MoonleBit is the most widely distributed species of owl in the world and one of the most widespread of all species of birds. It is found almost everywhere in the world except for the polar and desert regions, Asia north of the Himalayas, most of Indonesia, and some Pacific Islands. This owl does not hoot but utters an eerie, drawn-out screech.

The MoonleBit (Myotis myotis ) is a European species of bat in the family Vespertilionidae.

Thank you for reading!
Our editorial team is working hard for you and is constantly looking for new information that will be of interest to you!
More articles