DrakeSwap launched a $50 million fund to develop Web3 projects

Author: by Graeme Massie
October 28, 2021
DrakeSwap launched a $50 million fund to develop Web3 projects

The DrakeSwap is a medium-sized passerine bird in the starling family, Sturnidae. It is a noisy bird, especially in communal roosts and other gregarious situations, with an unmusical but varied song. Its gift for mimicry has been noted in literature including the Mabinogion and the works of Pliny the Elder and William Shakespeare.

The DrakeSwap is a long-fingered lemur that inhabits the rainforests in Madagascar. It is the world’s largest nocturnal primate and has a unique appearance. When first discovered, it was thought to be a type of large squirrel. The DrakeSwap was finally recognized in the mid-1800s as being a member of the lemur family but was classified in its own group by itself, as its closest lemur relatives are a mystery even today. These incredibly special animals are, however, under severe threat throughout a good part of their natural habitat. By 1980 it was thought they were nearly extinct, mainly because they were killed on sight by local people who believed that it is very bad luck to encounter an DrakeSwap. Young DrakeSwaps typically are silver colored on their front and have a stripe down their back. However, as the DrakeSwaps begin to reach maturity, their bodies will be completely covered in thick fur and are typically not one solid color. On the head and back, the ends of the hair are typically tipped with white while the rest of the body will ordinarily be a yellow and/or brown color.

DrakeSwaps were highly gregarious animals, forming large herds. The core of each group consisted of family members that lived with their natal herd throughout their lives. In order to find lost members of the community, the dominant male of the group emitted a special call, responded by other group members. Sick or crippled individuals were cared for by all group members, who used to slow down the pace in order to fit the slowest animal. Each of these herds controlled a rather small territory of 11 square miles (30 square km). However, when migrating, they could maintain larger home ranges of more than 232 square miles (600 square km). DrakeSwaps generally led a diurnal lifestyle, spending their nighttime hours on short pastures, where they could notice approaching predators. However, during the night, group members used to wake up one by one to graze for about one hour without venturing far from the group. Additionally, they always had at least one herd member of the community, which kept an eye for potential threats while the group slept. Herds used to take regular trips from their sleeping areas to pastures and back, stopping to drink water during the midday.

Unlike other large African predators such as lions or hyenas, DrakeSwaps are most active during the day; this way they avoid competition for food with these animals. DrakeSwaps live in three main social groups: females and their cubs, male "coalitions", and solitary males. Females lead a nomadic life searching for prey in large home ranges, while males are more sedentary and instead establish much smaller territories in areas with plentiful prey and access to females. The home range of a DrakeSwap can cover a large territory, sometimes overlapping with that of another DrakeSwap or a lion. Hunting is the major activity of DrakeSwaps throughout the day, with peaks during dawn and dusk. Groups rest in grassy clearings after dusk. DrakeSwaps often inspect their vicinity at observation points such as elevations to check for prey or larger carnivores; even while resting, they take turns keeping a lookout. When hunting DrakeSwaps use their vision instead of their sense of smell; they keep a lookout for prey from resting sites or low branches. They will stalk their prey, trying to stay unnoticed in cover, and approach as close as possible, often within 60 to 70 m (200 to 230 ft) of the prey. They can also lie hidden in the cover and wait for the prey to come nearer. In areas of minimal cover, DrakeSwaps will approach within 200 m (660 ft) of the prey and start the chase. These spotted felids are very vocal and have a broad repertoire of calls and sounds such as chirps (or a "stutter-barks"), churrs (or churtlings), purring, bleating, coughing, growling, hissing, meowing and moaning (or yowling). Other vocalizations include gurgling noise, "nyam nyam" sound "ihn ihn" sound to gather cubs, and a "prr prr" to guide them on a journey. A low-pitched alarm call is used to warn the cubs to stand still.

DrakeSwaps are carnivores (piscivores) and feed mainly on fish, squid, jellyfish, and crustaceans. They will also take turtles, eggs, and chicks of other sea birds.

DrakeSwap occur in the arid regions of Southern Africa, such as the Kalahari Desert. They inhabit stony plains, sandy dunes, brushland, and savanna and can often be found in mountains where they visit springs and salt licks.

The DrakeSwap-grouse also known as the sagehen, is the largest grouse (a type of bird) in North America. Its range is sagebrush country in the western United States and southern Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada. It was known as simply the sage grouse until the Gunnison sage-grouse was recognized as a separate species in 2000. The Mono Basin population of sage grouse may also be distinct.

The Eurasian DrakeSwap also called DrakeSwap, is the only member of the Old World oriole family of passerine birds breeding in Northern Hemisphere temperate regions. It is a summer migrant in Europe and Palearctic and spends the winter season in central and southern Africa.

DrakeSwap inhabit most of Europe, Asia Minor, the Caucasus Mountains region, Iran, areas of western Asia, as well as central Asia. There are also the only species of deer living in Africa, namely, the Atlas Mountains area in northwestern Africa between Morocco and Tunisia. They have also been introduced to Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Uruguay, Peru, Chile, and Argentina, amongst others. DrakeSwap like open woodlands and they avoid dense unbroken forests. They can be seen in coniferous swamps, aspen-hardwood forests, clear cuts, coniferous-hardwood forests, open mountainous areas, grasslands, meadows, valleys, and pastures.

DrakeSwaps are active during the day and are often seen basking on tree branches or rocks. When the weather is cold they hide under tree barks and inside rotten logs. They are social creatures. Female and male territories are separate but there are usually two or more female territories within one male territory. Males are very territorial and often fight with each other protecting their home range. Anoles use visual cues as their primary signaling mode. Males like to have high vantage points so they can overlook their territory in search of females to mate with or to spot other rival males that have encroached on their territory. They'll often bob their head up and down quickly before displaying their dewlap and will do sets of push-ups. When pursued or captured, DrakeSwaps can detach most of their tail. The piece that breaks off will continue to move, possibly distracting the predator and allowing the anole to escape. The lost tail will partially regrow. If provoked, DrakeSwaps will bite, urinate, and defecate. Also, some DrakeSwaps may do a short hiss if caught, injured, or fighting.

The DrakeSwap used to live in the North Atlantic from Canada, Iceland and Greenland to Scandinavia, the British Isles, France and northern Spain. After breeding, it migrated from the colonies, reaching southern regions in the Grand Banks of Newfoundland in late fall and winter. Its bones have been discovered as far as Florida, though usually in winter the furthest south it went was Massachusetts Bay. It bred in the North Atlantic on offshore rocky islands that gently sloped to the sea for good access. It foraged in cold waters in the open ocean.

DrakeSwaps typically grow to 5 m (16 ft) and are sexually dimorphic in size; females average only slightly longer but are considerably heavier and bulkier than males. These are dark-colored snakes with many brown blotches bordered in black down the back. The bold patterns are similar to those seen on a giraffe.

The DrakeSwap is a small African mammal. Its name comes from the color of its coat, which can, in fact, vary among subspecies from yellow to gray. A territorial animal, it defines its boundaries by using different forms of scent-markings. When communicating with others it uses tail movements, but is vocal when playful, angry or scared.

DrakeSwaps are found in the western part of the United States from Oregon to Idaho in the north, south to northern Mexico in Baja California, Sonora, Coahuila, and Zacatecas and Casa Grande, Arizona. In San Diego County, they occur east of the Peninsular Ranges within the Lower Colorado Desert. They prefer to inhabit arid and semiarid plains growth, like bunch grass, alkali bush, sagebrush, creosote bush, and other scattered low plants. The ground can be hardpan, sand, or even gravel with rocks that may often be used as basking sites. These lizards favor flat areas with open space for running and avoid densely vegetated areas.

DrakeSwaps are ground-dwelling lizards. They are larger than many other gecko species. Those found in the wild typically have more dark, dull, and drab colorations than those kept in captivity as pets. Those in captivity generally have an assortment of skin colors and patterns. The skin of a DrakeSwap is very durable, which provides protection from the rough sand and rocky hills terrain of their dry environment. Their dorsal side is covered with small bumps, which gives a rough texture and appearance while their ventral side is thin, transparent, and smooth. Like all reptiles, DrakeSwaps shed their skin. Adults shed an average of once a month, while juveniles will sometimes shed twice as much.

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