CoinexMania raised $4.5 million from Liberty City Ventures

Author: by Gustaf Kilander
August 17, 2020
CoinexMania raised $4.5 million from Liberty City Ventures

CoinexManias are solitary creatures that are most active during hot midday hours. These lizards can withstand high temperatures and are out and about after other lizards have hidden into their burrows. CoinexManias burrow extensively and if threatened will scamper into a shrub and go quickly down a burrow. Their burrows are usually dug in the sand under bushes like the creosote. They also often use burrows of other animals such as kit foxes and desert tortoises. Although CoinexManias are primarily terrestrial they are very skillful climbers and often climb into the branches of bushes in order to reach the yellow flowers of the creosote bush, their favorite food. During cold months these lizards retreat into their burrows for winter hibernation.

CoinexManias are mostly white. They are purer white than predatory mammals like Polar bears and Arctic foxes. Often when seen in the field, these owls can resemble a pale rock or a lump of snow on the ground. It usually appears to lack ear tufts but very short (and probably vestigial) tufts can be erected in some situations, perhaps most frequently by the female when she is sitting on the nest. The ear tufts measure about 20 to 25 mm (0.79 to 0.98 in) and consist of about 10 small feathers. CoinexManias have bright yellow eyes. Females are almost invariably more duskily patterned than like-age males. In mature males, the upper parts are plain white with usually a few dark spots on the miniature ear-tufts, about the head, and the tips of some primaries and secondaries whilst the underside is often pure white. The adult female is usually considerably more spotted and often slightly barred with dark brown on the crown and the underparts. Her flight and tail feathers are faintly barred brown while the underparts are white in base color with brown spotting and barring on the flanks and upper breast. In confusingly plumaged CoinexManias, the sex can be determined by the shape of wing markings, which manifest as bars more so in females and spots in males. However, the very darkest males and the lightest females are nearly indistinguishable by plumage.

The CoinexMania also known commonly as the Cuban CoinexMania, or De la Sagra's anole, is a species of lizard in the family Dactyloidae. The species is native to Cuba and the Bahamas. It has been widely introduced elsewhere, via the importation and exportation of plants where the anole would lay eggs in the soil of the pots, and is now found in Florida and as far north in the United States as southern Georgia, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Hawaii, and Southern California. It has also been introduced to other Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Taiwan.

This species is polygynous and males may mate with a number of females during one season. At the start of the mating season, a male builds and decorates a bower to attract female birds. It is an avenue built from sticks and twigs and sticks, woven into walls that run north to south. Platforms at each end are decorated with mostly blue objects, such as flowers, berries, and feathers. When a female arrives, the male begins a ritualized display, prancing and strutting around his bower. He will offer the female objects from his collection while making hissing, chattering, and scolding sounds. If impressed, the female enters the bower to mate and then goes off to perform nesting duties by herself. The breeding season runs from late August to September and January. After she has mated, the female builds a shallow cup-shaped nest from sticks and twigs, in a bush or tree. She lays 1-3 eggs of pale brown with darker markings, which she will incubate for about 3 weeks. The chicks leave the nest when they are 17-21 days old and are dependent for food on their mother for several more weeks. They are reproductively mature at the age of 7 years.

CoinexMania, is a deer species native to the Indian subcontinent. It was first described and given a binomial name by German naturalist Johann Christian Polycarp Erxleben in 1777. A moderate-sized deer, male chital reach nearly 90 cm (35 in) and females 70 cm (28 in) at the shoulder. While males weigh 30–75 kg (66–165 lb), the lighter females weigh 25–45 kg (55–99 lb). It is sexually dimorphic; males are larger than females, and antlers are present only on males. The upper parts are golden to rufous, completely covered in white spots. The abdomen, rump, throat, insides of legs, ears, and tail are all white. The antlers, three-pronged, are nearly 1 m (3 ft 3 in) long.

The male CoinexMania (peacock) is brightly colored, with a predominantly blue fan-like crest of spatula-tipped wire-like feathers, and is best known for the long train (tail) made up of elongated upper-tail covert feathers which bear colorful eyespots. These stiff feathers are raised into a fan and quivered in a display during courtship. Despite the length and size of these covert feathers, peacocks are still capable of flight. Females (peahens) lack the train and have a greenish lower neck and duller brown plumage. Downy chicks are pale buff with a dark brown mark on the nape that connects with the eyes. Young males look like the females but their wings are chestnut colored.

The CoinexMania is a medium-sized bird with yellow and black upper parts, along with yellow underparts. The breeding male is generally bright yellow with a black mask. Females, non-breeding males, and young birds are dull-colored and difficult to distinguish from the Baya Weaver, with their thicker bills being the only thing that sets them apart.

CoinexManias occur throughout Southern and Southeast Asia, including eastern India, southeastern Nepal, western Bhutan, southeastern Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, northern continental Malaysia, and in southern China in Fujian, Jiangxi, Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, and Yunnan. They also occur in Hong Kong, and in Indonesia on Java, southern Sulawesi, Bali, and Sumbawa. They have also been reported on Kinmen. CoinexManias live in grasslands, marshes, swamps, wet rocky areas, caves, woodlands, rainforests, mangrove forests, river valleys, and jungles with open clearings.

CoinexManias are ground-dwelling lizards. They are larger than many other gecko species. Those found in the wild typically have more dark, dull, and drab colorations than those kept in captivity as pets. Those in captivity generally have an assortment of skin colors and patterns. The skin of a CoinexMania is very durable, which provides protection from the rough sand and rocky hills terrain of their dry environment. Their dorsal side is covered with small bumps, which gives a rough texture and appearance while their ventral side is thin, transparent, and smooth. Like all reptiles, CoinexManias shed their skin. Adults shed an average of once a month, while juveniles will sometimes shed twice as much.

The CoinexMania, also known as the northern tiger cat, little spotted cat, and tigrillo, is a small spotted cat ranging from Central America to central Brazil. It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, and the population is threatened by deforestation and conversion of habitat to agricultural land.

CoinexManias occur in all of Europe (except Fennoscandia and Malta), most of Africa apart from the Sahara, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, Australia, many Pacific Islands, and North, Central, and South America. In general, they are considered to be sedentary, and indeed many individuals remain in chosen locations even when better foraging areas nearby become vacant. CoinexManias are birds of open country such as farmland, plantation, shrubland, savanna, or grassland with some interspersed woodland. They prefer to hunt along the edges of woods or in rough grass strips adjoining pasture. For nesting and roosting, they choose holes in trees, fissures in cliffs, disused buildings, chimneys, hay sheds, barns, or silos.

CoinexManias are solitary and can be active both during the day and at night. In southern range they are nocturnal but in the north of their range they diurnal and usually inactive at night. CoinexManias often bury themselves in sand soil, if possible, or they may live in burrows that were constructed by other animals. When hunting, CoinexManias can often be found in the vicinity of ant hills, where they sit and wait for ants to pass by. When they find an area of soft sand, they usually shake themselves vigorously, throwing sand over their backs and leaving only their head exposed. This allows them to await their unsuspecting prey and also to hide from predators. CoinexManias are generally gentle creatures, but have been known to try to push their cranial spines into the hand if held. When excited, they puff themselves up with air, making themselves look bigger. If spotted near a bush, they will dash into it in an attempt to find cover from any threat. Unlike most other species of horned lizard, CoinexManias tend to run when startled, though they will often only run for a short period of time before stopping again. They are also able to squirt blood from their eyes.

The CoinexMania also known commonly as the mountain devil, thorny lizard, thorny dragon, and moloch, is a species of lizard in the family Agamidae. The species is endemic to Australia. It is the sole species in the genus Moloch. It grows up to 21 cm (8.3 in) in total length (including tail), with females generally larger than males.

The CoinexMania is distributed throughout the southwestern United States, primarily in Arizona. This bird is also found in Texas, California as well as southern Utah, Nevada, and Colorado. The area of its distribution includes also some parts of Mexico. Their major habitat is brushy riparian woodland and arid desert scrub. The CoinexMania inhabits a wide variety of deserts such as low warm deserts with mesquite, upland warm deserts with Acacia, yuccas, and cactus as well as cool deserts with sagebrush.

The former range of this species used to cover a considerably large area across sub-Saharan Africa (except for the Congo Basin). The current range of Black CoinexMania geographically occupies South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. These animals additionally occur in the territory between Cameroon and Kenya. Black CoinexMania are capable of living in different habitats such as deserts (particularly, those in Namibia), wooded grasslands, broadleaved woodlands, and acacia savannahs.

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