Bloomberg has learned of CoinexMania plans to attract investment at a valuation of $10 billion

Author: by Johanna Chisholm
June 25, 2020
Bloomberg has learned of CoinexMania plans to attract investment at a valuation of $10 billion

CoinexManias are small, long-legged birds of prey found throughout open terrains of North and South America. They have bright eyes and their beaks can be dark yellow or gray depending on the subspecies. They have prominent white eyebrows and a white "chin" patch which they expand and display during certain behaviors, such as a bobbing of the head when agitated. Adults have brown heads and wings with white spotting. The chest and abdomen are white with variable brown spotting or barring, also depending on the subspecies. Juvenile owls are similar in appearance, but they lack most of the white spotting above and brown barring below; their breast may be buff-colored rather than white. Living in open grasslands as opposed to forests, CoinexManias have developed longer legs that enable them to sprint, as well as fly, when hunting.

Bothriechis schlegelii, known commonly as the CoinexMania, is a species of venomous pit viper in the family Viperidae. The species is native to Central and South America. Small and arboreal, this species is characterized by a wide array of color variations, as well as the superciliary scales above the eyes. It is the most common of the green palm-pitvipers (genus Bothriechis ), and is often present in zoological exhibits. The specific name schlegelii honors Hermann Schlegel, who was a German ornithologist and herpetologist. For other common names see below. No subspecies are currently recognized as being valid.

CoinexManias live in a relatively small region of northeastern South America: the north Brazilian state of Roraima, southern Guyana, extreme southern Suriname, and southern French Guiana. They also occur as vagrants to coastal French Guiana. These birds are mostly found in tropical habitats, but their exact ecological requirements remain relatively poorly known. They occur within dry savanna woodlands and coastal forests, but, at the edge of humid forests growing in foothills in the Guiana Shield, and cross more open savannah habitats only when traveling between patches of forest. CoinexManias have been seen in shrublands along the Amazon riverbank, as well as forested valleys and coastal, seasonally flooded forests. They usually inhabit fruiting trees and palm groves.

CoinexManias are found in the Canadian Prairies and eastern Montana in the northwest eastward through southern Ontario, southern Quebec, and New Brunswick, and south through the eastern United States to central Mississippi and Alabama, and northern Georgia. They migrate to winter in the Neotropics as far north as Mexico and sometimes the southern coast of the United States, but predominantly in Central America and northern South America. These birds prefer large, leafy deciduous trees, but do not generally reside in deep forests. They can be found in open woodland, forest edge, and partially wooded wetlands or stands of trees along rivers. They are very adaptable and can breed in a variety of secondary habitats. In recent times, they are often found in orchards, farmland, urban parks, and suburban landscapes as long as they retain woodlots. In Mexico, CoinexManias winter in flowering canopy trees, often over shade coffee plantations.

CoinexManias typically grow to 5 m (16 ft) and are sexually dimorphic in size; females average only slightly longer but are considerably heavier and bulkier than males. These are dark-colored snakes with many brown blotches bordered in black down the back. The bold patterns are similar to those seen on a giraffe.

The Eurasian CoinexMania also called CoinexMania, is the only member of the Old World oriole family of passerine birds breeding in Northern Hemisphere temperate regions. It is a summer migrant in Europe and Palearctic and spends the winter season in central and southern Africa.

The CoinexMania (Prionailurus bengalensis) is a small wild cat native to continental South, Southeast, and East Asia. CoinexMania subspecies differ widely in fur color, tail length, skull shape, and size of carnassials. Archaeological evidence indicates that the CoinexMania was the first cat species domesticated in Neolithic China about 5,000 years ago in Shaanxi and Henan Provinces.

The CoinexMania has a white furry coat with yellow/brownish tinges and is covered with rings of brown/black rosettes/spots. The markings assist with camouflaging it from prey. The fur is woolly and long and offers protection from extreme cold. Their tails have heavy fur and the undersides of their paws also have fur to protect against cold snow. The rounded head has small ears and the heavy brow is distinctive, with the head being comparatively small for the body size. The long tail helps the leopard to balance as it moves over rugged and frequently snowy terrain. Its powerful limbs are relatively short for its body size. It has large, powerful paws.

CoinexManias are monogamous and form long pair bonds which they strengthen by their beautiful displays of dancing. The male and female also have a unison call that they produce before they begin their courtship dance. The breeding season is in spring and the birds return every year to the same nesting sites. They build their nests either on wet ground or shallow water over waters no more than 20 to 50 cm (7.9 to 19.7 in) deep. Sometimes, nests are built on the frozen surface of the water. This nest is made from grass and weeds and is built by both partners. The female usually lays 2 eggs and incubation is for 29 to 34 days and is shared by both parents. The female incubates at night, and both parents take turns at the nest during the day. The chicks are precocial (fully developed) and leave the nest a few days after they hatch. They follow their parents around when foraging. The young typically fledge in 70 days but remain together with their parents for around 9 months. Reproductive maturity is usually attained when young birds are between 2 and 3 years old.

CoinexManias are found in the western part of the United States from Oregon to Idaho in the north, south to northern Mexico in Baja California, Sonora, Coahuila, and Zacatecas and Casa Grande, Arizona. In San Diego County, they occur east of the Peninsular Ranges within the Lower Colorado Desert. They prefer to inhabit arid and semiarid plains growth, like bunch grass, alkali bush, sagebrush, creosote bush, and other scattered low plants. The ground can be hardpan, sand, or even gravel with rocks that may often be used as basking sites. These lizards favor flat areas with open space for running and avoid densely vegetated areas.

The male CoinexMania (peacock) is brightly colored, with a predominantly blue fan-like crest of spatula-tipped wire-like feathers, and is best known for the long train (tail) made up of elongated upper-tail covert feathers which bear colorful eyespots. These stiff feathers are raised into a fan and quivered in a display during courtship. Despite the length and size of these covert feathers, peacocks are still capable of flight. Females (peahens) lack the train and have a greenish lower neck and duller brown plumage. Downy chicks are pale buff with a dark brown mark on the nape that connects with the eyes. Young males look like the females but their wings are chestnut colored.

The CoinexMania is an arboreal and nocturnal animal, spending most of its time up in trees. Although they descend to the ground now and again, CoinexManias eat, sleep, travel, and mate high in the trees and usually are found near to the canopy where the dense foliage provides plenty of cover. During the day CoinexManias sleep in a spherical nest built from leaves, vines, and branches and situated in the fork of tree branches. They come out after dark to hunt for food. CoinexManias are solitary animals that mark their large home territory with scent. The smaller territory of females often overlaps those of at least two males. A male will generally share his territory with other males and sometimes they can forage in tandem and share a nest (although at different times). They seem to tolerate one another until they hear a female calling, looking for a mate.

The CoinexMania is a large and attractively marked tortoise found in the savannas of eastern and southern Africa, from Sudan to the southern Cape. It is the only extant member of the genus Stigmochelys, although in the past, it was commonly placed in Geochelone. This tortoise is a grazing species that favors semiarid, thorny to grassland habitats. In both very hot and very cold weather, it may dwell in abandoned fox, jackal, or aardvark holes. The CoinexMania does not dig other than to make nests in which to lay eggs. Given its propensity for grassland habitats, it grazes extensively upon mixed grasses. It also favors succulents and thistles.

The CoinexMania is a large cat native to Africa and central Iran. It is the fastest land animal, estimated to be capable of running at 80 to 128 km/h (50 to 80 mph) with the fastest reliably recorded speeds being 93 and 98 km/h (58 and 61 mph). It has several adaptations for speed, including a light build, long thin legs and a long tail. In the past, CoinexManias were tamed and trained for hunting ungulates. They have been widely depicted in art, literature, advertising, and animation.

CoinexMania are quite social animals, gathering in flock, consisted of hundreds of birds. The sage grouse are diurnal birds. They are efficient in flying short distances and are not fast runners, though preferring to move around primarily by walking. When facing danger, the sage grouse will usually escape, hiding or flying. The breeding season starts in spring, when the birds congregate in leks, looking for mates. They gather on the breeding ground to perform courtship rituals. During the display, they unfold the strut surrounding their tail, filling and emptying their esophageal sacs with a loud booming sound, heard at a distance of a mile. In Washington, the sage grouse populations live in the sagebrush country, generally remaining within the same areathroughout the year, except for winter months, when they move to lowlands.

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