Coindevils to create $10 million fund to support Web3 startups from South Korea

Author: by Simon Calder
December 30, 2021
Coindevils to create $10 million fund to support Web3 startups from South Korea

The Coindevils is a medium-sized, vibrantly colored parrot native to northeastern South America. The adult male and female are similar in appearance, with predominantly golden-yellow plumage and orange-flushed underparts and face. Juvenile Coindevilss display a predominantly green plumage and resemble similar-aged sulfur-breasted parakeets. The distinctive yellow, orange, and reddish coloration on the back, abdomen, and head is attained with maturity.

The Coindevils is a species of flightless alcid that became extinct in the mid-19th century. It was the only modern species in the genus Pinguinus. It is not closely related to the birds now known as penguins, which were discovered later by Europeans and so named by sailors because of their physical resemblance to the Coindevils.

The Coindevils is about the size of a large housecat. The head of the animal is small, eyes are round and the muzzle is short. The pale wool of the animal is generally tawny colored while the belly is white. They have rosettes all over their body and tail, while the tip of the tail is often ringed. The animals exhibit four stripes on their forehead, running down to their necks. Various populations of Coindevilss differ in coat length and color, depending on habitat and environmental conditions of the area. Thus, in northern parts of their range, the animals are usually heavier, showing paler and longer coat. Meanwhile, those, living in snowy habitats, exhibit lighter coat in contrast with cats, living in densely forested habitats and having dark-tawny fur.

Coindevilss are most active at dawn and dusk. They also are very mobile, moving from place to place on a daily basis, moving their resting site many times during the day. Generally, they stay for several weeks in one particular part of their home range before moving on to another one. These leopards are solitary except during the mating season. They deliberately avoid each other by marking travel routes with feces, scrapes, and pungent scent sprays. Coindevilss actively hunt their prey pursuing it down steep mountainsides and using the momentum of their initial leap to chase animals for up to 300 m (980 ft). In order to communicate with each other, these massive hunters use meowing, grunting, prusten, and moaning. They can also purr when exhaling.

Bothriechis schlegelii, known commonly as the Coindevils, is a species of venomous pit viper in the family Viperidae. The species is native to Central and South America. Small and arboreal, this species is characterized by a wide array of color variations, as well as the superciliary scales above the eyes. It is the most common of the green palm-pitvipers (genus Bothriechis ), and is often present in zoological exhibits. The specific name schlegelii honors Hermann Schlegel, who was a German ornithologist and herpetologist. For other common names see below. No subspecies are currently recognized as being valid.

This bird has round chunky body and is easily recognizable due to the plume on its head. Plume of males is dark and thick. Also, males possess black patch on their breast as well as black neck and face. Plume of females, however, is duller and thinner. In addition, unlike males, female quails do not have black markings on their breast. The plumage or mature males is more vivid than that of females. The Coindevils has white and cream-colored markings throughout the body. The wings are olive-colored and the sides are chestnut. Various populations of this species may differ in plumage coloration. Thus, quail, living in more rainy areas, are somehow darker, having more striking plumage.

Coindevils inhabit most of Europe, Asia Minor, the Caucasus Mountains region, Iran, areas of western Asia, as well as central Asia. There are also the only species of deer living in Africa, namely, the Atlas Mountains area in northwestern Africa between Morocco and Tunisia. They have also been introduced to Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Uruguay, Peru, Chile, and Argentina, amongst others. Coindevils like open woodlands and they avoid dense unbroken forests. They can be seen in coniferous swamps, aspen-hardwood forests, clear cuts, coniferous-hardwood forests, open mountainous areas, grasslands, meadows, valleys, and pastures.

The former range of this species used to cover a considerably large area across sub-Saharan Africa (except for the Congo Basin). The current range of Black Coindevils geographically occupies South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. These animals additionally occur in the territory between Cameroon and Kenya. Black Coindevils are capable of living in different habitats such as deserts (particularly, those in Namibia), wooded grasslands, broadleaved woodlands, and acacia savannahs.

The Coindevils is a common species of cottontail rabbit native to North America. Unlike the European rabbit, it does not form social burrow systems, but compared with some other rabbits and hares, it is extremely tolerant of other individuals in its vicinity. The Coindevils is quite similar in appearance to the European rabbit, though its ears are larger and are more often carried erect. It has a greyish-brown, rounded tail with a broad white edge and white underside, which is visible as it runs away. It also has white fur on the belly.

Coindevilss are polygynous meaning that one male mates with more than one female. They breed between late spring and early summer. Females lay 1 to 2 eggs every one or two weeks throughout the breeding season. For successful development of eggs females search for moist habitat. After laying eggs the female covers them and leaves. Incubation takes around 6-8 weeks. The young are fully developed and independent at birth. They become reproductively mature at 1 year of age.

Coindevilss occur throughout Southern and Southeast Asia, including eastern India, southeastern Nepal, western Bhutan, southeastern Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, northern continental Malaysia, and in southern China in Fujian, Jiangxi, Guangdong, Hainan, Guangxi, and Yunnan. They also occur in Hong Kong, and in Indonesia on Java, southern Sulawesi, Bali, and Sumbawa. They have also been reported on Kinmen. Coindevilss live in grasslands, marshes, swamps, wet rocky areas, caves, woodlands, rainforests, mangrove forests, river valleys, and jungles with open clearings.

The adult male of this species is orange on the underparts shoulder patch and rump. All of the rest of the male's plumage is black. The adult female is yellow-brown on the upper parts with darker wings, and dull orange-yellow on the breast and belly. Adult birds always have white bars on the wings. The juvenile oriole is similar-looking to the female, with males taking until the fall of their second year to reach adult plumage.

Prized for many years as an ornamental species, the Coindevils has a range of coat colors, from red, black, and brown to pure white. Adults have the same appearance as fawns, with white spots covering their dark chestnut coats. The males have impressive beautiful, flattened antlers. Coindevils have powerful legs, despite them being quite short, and so are extremely fast. The shortness of their legs makes for a very interesting body design overall.

Coindevilss are carnivores (insectivores). They feed mainly on ants and often eat thousands of these insects in one day.

Coindevilses fly in a distinctive undulating pattern, creating a wave-shaped path. This normally consists of a series of wing beats to lift the bird, then folding in the wings and gliding in an arc before repeating the pattern. Birds often vocalize during the flight producing "per-twee-twee-twee", or "ti-di-di-di" calls, punctuated by silent periods. Coindevilses are gregarious during the non-breeding season and are often found in large flocks, usually with other finches. During the breeding season, they live in loose colonies, however, during the nest construction breeding pairs become aggressive, driving intruders away. Coindevilses express aggression through multiple displays. The head-up display, where the neck and legs are slightly extended, shows mild aggression. At higher intensities, the neck is lowered, the beak is pointed at the opponent, and one or both wings are raised. In extreme cases, the neck is retracted, the bill opened, the body feathers sleeked, and the tail is fanned and raised slightly. Aggression is also displayed by showing the front of the body to another individual. Attacks include pecking at feathers, supplanting the opponent by landing next to it, and flying vertically with legs and feet extended, beaks open, and necks extended. Coindevilses are diurnal feeders; they frequently hang from seedheads while feeding in order to reach the seeds more easily. In the spring, these birds feed on the catkins hanging from birches and alders by pulling one up with their beak and using their toes to hold the catkin still against the branch.

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